Verb idioms

Verb idioms
Глагольные обороты
1. used to (оборот used to)
2. be going to (оборот be going to)
3. be to (оборот be to)

English-Russian grammar dictionary. 2014.

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Смотреть что такое "Verb idioms" в других словарях:

  • Phrasal verb — A phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and a preposition, a verb and an adverb, or a verb with both an adverb and a preposition, any of which are part of the syntax of the sentence, and so are a complete semantic unit. Sentences, however, may… …   Wikipedia

  • List of sports idioms — The following is a list of phrases derived from sports which have become idioms (slang or otherwise) in English. They have evolved a usage and meaning independent of sports and are often used by those with little knowledge of these games. The… …   Wikipedia

  • Ditransitive verb — In grammar, a ditransitive verb is a verb which takes a subject and two objects which refer to a recipient and a theme. According to certain linguistics considerations, these objects may be called direct and indirect, or primary and secondary.… …   Wikipedia

  • English language idioms derived from baseball — B = * ballpark: in the ballpark, ballpark figure, and out of the ballpark mdash; Ballpark has been used to mean a broad area of approximation or similarity, or a range within which comparison is possible; this usage OED dates to 1960. Another… …   Wikipedia

  • haul off — {v.} To move suddenly. Used with and usually before a verb like hit or kick . * /Ed hauled off and hit the other boy in the nose./ * /Lee hauled off and threw a touchdown pass./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • heart and soul(1) — {n.} Eager love; strong feeling; great enthusiasm. Often used with a singular verb. * /When Mr. Pitt plays the piano, his heart and soul is in it./ * /John plays tennis badly, but with heart and soul./ * /Mary wanted a puppy with all her heart… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • month of Sundays — {n. phr.}, informal A very long time. Used for emphasis after for or in and usually with a negative verb. * /I have not had devil s food cake in a month of Sundays./ * /When he got her first letter, he felt that he had not heard from her for a… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • stand on ceremony — {v. phr.} To follow strict rules of politeness; be very formal with other people. Usually used with a helping verb in the negative. * /Grandmother does not stand on ceremony when her grandchildren call./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • well and good — {adj. phr.} Good; satisfactory. * /If my daughter finishes high school, I will call that well and good./ Often used without a verb to show agreement or understanding. * /Well and good; I will come to your house tomorrow./ Compare: ALL RIGHT, ALL… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • would that — or[I would that] or[would God] or[would heaven] {literary} I wish that. Used at the beginning of a sentence expressing a wish; followed by a verb in the subjunctive; found mostly in poetry and older literature. * /Would that I could only drop… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • haul off — {v.} To move suddenly. Used with and usually before a verb like hit or kick . * /Ed hauled off and hit the other boy in the nose./ * /Lee hauled off and threw a touchdown pass./ …   Dictionary of American idioms


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